Making Training Transformational

Guest blogger: Kimberly Smith

I recently left my corporate T & D job and started over in a new career. Once I had made
careerup my mind to put my happiness first, I sought out job opportunities that were more aligned with my hobbies and lifestyle and looked for ways that I could bring my T & D experience in to those types of roles. I am six months in to this terrifying but thrilling journey, and I am here to tell you that it’s possible! Being brave enough to take the leap is the hardest part. Finding opportunities to incorporate your training experience will present themselves in new and exciting ways you never imagined before!

For example, I now work for a company that encourages in the moment feedback (both positive and constructive) and I was recently given feedback that my methods of teaching other team members needed to be less “transactional” and more “transformational”. This really got me thinking critically about all the opportunities we have to teach others in our careers and in our personal lives. Not only to educate, but also to elevate. Explaining the basics of the situation is always helpful, but taking the conversation one step further will be even more memorable and far more significant of a learning experience for all parties involved.
office workers-2Next time you find yourself in a teachable moment, consider this approach. How can you educate AND elevate the person you are coaching? What do they have to teach you in return?

For further learning, check out this article from Executive Travel Magazine on how feedback contributes to successful company cultures overall.

 

Sloane, Jackie. “Creating Successful Company Cultures.” Executive Travel Magazine. N.p., Dec. 2010. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <http://www.executivetravelmagazine.com/articles/creating-successful-company-cultures&gt;.

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About Meade Peers McCoy

I am driven to learn, about the world and the people in it, learn to do new things, learn to see things in a new way.
This entry was posted in Guest Student Post, Human Performance Improvement, Instructional Design, Learning Theory, Training. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Making Training Transformational

  1. Kimberly Smith says:

    Thank you ladies! Keep teaching and keep sharing!

  2. Adrienne Meachum says:

    Hi Kimberly,

    I find your message very enlightening and I found myself taking some of my hobbies to actually be real “training moments” to share with others as well. Many of my friends would often ask me where I bought a particular item that I would be wearing and when I explained that I made it myself, they began to ask me how and I found myself telling them step-by-step information they could use themselves to make it on their own. I also found working at the computer labs here at Roosevelt University also afforded me the opportunity when asked questions of how to do something, I could actually demonstrate it and then they would try it on their own and began to accomplish the challenge they needed help with. So I guess as you stated in your message that teachable moments are both opportunities for you to coach someone and also in return they offer teaching you something in return. I find this fascinating and a great take-away on both parts.

    Thanks,

    Adrienne Meachum

  3. Sandra Aguilera says:

    Hi Kim, I think that it’s commendable to venture out and pursue your dreams. Often times, it’s not easy and puts you in a very uncomfortable stage, but in time you really learn from your new experiences. I’m classified in my organization as being a “young” trainer considering that I’m working alongside individuals that have been in the field for as long as I have been alive. It can be intimidating at times. You definitely have to be open to new ideas and information. What I have learned during coaching or mentoring sessions is that you have to be patient and not always assume the person understands your point of view. Most importantly listen to what they are telling you.

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