Tag Archives: Instructional Design

Training Evaluation Series Part 4: Measurement Tools from Scholarly Publications

Last week, in the post, “Measuring Intangible Benefits“, you were introduced to strategies to locate tests that allow you to quantify the intangible outcomes of training by using the Mental Measurements Yearbook. As you will find, the “Yearbook” reviews commercially available tests, but there are many other tests in published research studies. The best database available to locate tests is PsychTests,

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Training Evaluation Series Part 3: Measuring Intangible Benefits

When considering the word “intangible” terms like ethereal, ghostly, spectral, unearthly and supernatural come to mind. Not exactly how we think of the efficient and grounded process of calculating the return on investment (ROI) of training. In the Phillips ROI Methodology (see diagram below), intangible benefits are those that not readily converted to a monetary value; outcomes that are difficult

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Training Evaluation Series Part 2: Formative Assessment

Few words elicit a more immediate and visceral response than the word “test.” That’s because, in most educational settings, we have testing all wrong. Often, tests are s a primary measure of success and in some instances can have lifelong ramifications—like the ACT and SAT—on one’s future. The same holds true for training evaluation. We often focus on summative evaluation

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A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Infographics in Learning & Development

Information graphics or infographics are visual representations of information, data or knowledge that convey ideas in a complete visual snapshot, like the one to the right that describes a survey of instructional designers. Infographics gained popularity in news media and became so enmeshed that a new field of study, data journalism, evolved. There are also many reasons to use infographics in learning environments.

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Training Superglue: Design elements that make learning stick

Are the following statements about learning true or false? The best way to learn from a textbook is to read it over and over. Learning material is retained if it is easy. Practicing a skill over and over leads to successful performance. Creativity is more important than knowledge. Testing is an ineffective learning tool. You might be surprised when you check

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Content Curation: A mostly curated blog post

  Back in the day—and by that, I mean 2012—there were rumblings about “curation” or “content curation” within the T&D world. For example, David Kelly wrote a brilliant blog post about it for ATD (then, ASTD). Some T&D practitioners may have dismissed this topic as simply e-Knowledge Management (KM); that is, more stuff with better tools. After all, even backer

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